Baking at home during lockdown

During lockdown, it seemed as though every other person was baking something, whether it was cakes or banana bread, sourdough or ciabatta. This was also evidenced by the shortage of many baking essentials in the supermarkets at this time.

Of course, as our lives have returned to something a little more normal, many of us have gone back to buying our baked goods, rather than making our own. But what prompted this lockdown baking spree?

According to an article for the Metro, bread making in particular can calm anxiety, which might be why so many people took it up as a hobby during the height of the pandemic.

Author of the book Bread Therapy: The Mindful Art of Baking Bread Pauline Beaumont told the newspaper that she wasn’t surprised to see so many people having a go at baking their own bread this year.

“We’re living in an atmosphere of threat and what we need is to feel soothed, calm and to regulate our emotions. We also need grounding, which is about belonging. Breadmaking does that,” she said.

Ms Beaumont is a trained psychologist and in her book she explores how breadmaking forced her to slow down in her life.

The process of breadmaking is also good for helping people to accept that we all make mistakes in our lives, she added.

As the Guardian suggested last month, our national baking obsession might not be over just yet. With the nights drawing in and the threat of local lockdowns looming, the newspaper suggested that more of us could test our baking skills with elaborate cakes in the coming months.

Of course, plenty of people don’t have the patience for cake or bread baking, so make sure you have a selection of wrapped cakes and bread available for all of your customers who don’t feel the need to bake at home.